New study reveals how controlling wheat hormones can cool hot crops

By Katie Lutz/CIMMYT

MEXICO CITY, Mexico (February 2, 2017) — Reductions of spike-ethylene, a plant-aging hormone, could increase wheat yields by 10 to 15 percent in warm locations, according to a recent study published in New Phytologist journal.

Ethylene is usually produced by plants at different developmental stages and can cause a wide range of negative effects on plant growth and development.

When hot weather hits a wheat field an increase in ethylene levels can lessen the amount of grains produced on ears or spikes by limiting the export of carbohydrates to pollen development.

Crop sensors sharpen nitrogen management for wheat in Pakistan

By Abdul Hamid, Ansaar Ahmed and Imtiaz Hussain/CIMMYT

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (February 1, 2017) – Pakistani and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) scientists are working with wheat farmers to test and promote precision agriculture technology that allows the farmers to save money, maintain high yields and reduce the environmentally harmful overuse of nitrogen fertilizer.

Wheat is planted on more than 9 million hectares in Pakistan each year. Of this, 85 percent is grown under irrigation in farming systems that include several crops.

Agricultural researchers forge new ties to develop nutritious crops and environmental farming

By Mike Listman/CIMMYT

EL BATAN, Mexico (January 25, 2017)—Scientists from two of the world’s leading agricultural research institutes will embark on joint research to boost global food security, mitigate environmental damage from farming, and help to reduce food grain imports by developing countries.

At a recent meeting, 30 scientists from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) and Rothamsted Research, a UK-based independent science institute, agreed to pool expertise in research to develop higher-yielding, more disease resistant and nutritious wheat varieties for use in more productive, climate-resilient farming systems.

Cornell receives UK support to aid scientists fighting threats to global wheat supply

By Linda McCandless/Cornell University

ITHACA, New York (January 25,2017)- Cornell University will receive $10.5 million in UK aid investment from the British people to help an international consortium of plant breeders, pathologists and surveillance experts overcome diseases hindering global food security efforts.

The funds for the four-year Delivering Genetic Gain in Wheat, or DGGW, project will build on a $24 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, announced in March 2016, and bring the total to $34.5 million.

Harnessing medical technology and global partnerships to drive gains in food crop productivity

By Mike Listman/CIMMYT

EL BATÁN, Mexico (December 22,2016)-  Global research networks must overcome nationalist and protectionist tendencies to provide technology advances the world urgently needs, said a leading German scientist at a recent gathering in Mexico of 200 agricultural experts from more than 20 countries.

“Agriculture’s critical challenges of providing food security and better nutrition in the face of climate change can only be met through global communities that share knowledge and outputs; looking inward will not lead to results,” said Ulrich Schurr, director of the Institute of Bio- and Geosciences of the Forschungszentrum Jülich research center, speaking at the 4th International Plant Phenotyping Symposium

One such community is the International Plant Phenotyping Network(IPPN), chaired by Schurr and co-host of the symposium in December, with the Mexico-based International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, known by its Spanish acronym, CIMMYT.

2nd call for proposals from the International Wheat Yield Partnership

By Jeff Gwyn/IWYP

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (December 16, 2016) –The International Wheat Yield Partnership (IWYP) is initiating its Second Competitive Funding Call by inviting creative, forward-looking proposals that seek to discover resilient and sustainable approaches to substantially increase the genetic yield potential of wheat, as defined by grain yield under the absence of stress, for the benefit of developed and developing countries. It is anticipated that wheat yield potential can be enhanced by:

  • Increasing carbon capture before floweringiwyp
  • Increasing biomass
  • Optimizing harvest index
  • Enhancing photosynthetic pathways
  • Specific changes in plant architecture
  • Modifying phenology, e.g., flowering time
  • Hybrid wheat system development
  • Root structure and growth
  • Faster / alternative breeding methods
  • Modeling to define best traits per environment

Advice for India’s rice-wheat farmers: Put aside the plow and save straw to fight pollution

By Mike Listman/CIMMYT 

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The Turbo Happy Seeder allows farmers to sow a rotation crop directly into the residues of a previous crop—in this case, wheat seed into rice straw—without plowing, a practice that raises yields, saves costs and promotes healthier soil and cleaner air.

EL BATAN, Mexico (November 28,2016) – Recent media reports show that the 19 million inhabitants of New Delhi are under siege from a noxious haze generated by traffic, industries, cooking fires and the burning of over 30 million tons of rice straw on farms in the neighboring states of Haryana and Punjab.

However, farmers who rotate wheat and rice crops in their fields and deploy a sustainable agricultural technique known as “zero tillage” can make a significant contribution to reducing smog in India’s capital, helping urban dwellers breathe more easily.

Since the 1990s, scientists at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) have been working with national partners and advanced research institutes in India to test and promote reduced tillage which allows rice-wheat farmers of South Asia to save money, better steward their soil and water resources, cut greenhouse gas emissions and stop the burning of crop residues.

The key innovation involves sowing wheat seed directly into untilled soil and rice residues in a single tractor pass, a method known as zero tillage. Originally deemed foolish by many farmers and researchers, the practice or its adaptations slowly caught on and by 2008 were being used to sow wheat by farmers on some 1.8 million hectares in India.

Click here to read more about how scientists and policymakers are promoting the technique as a key alternative for residue burning and to help clear Delhi’s deadly seasonal smog.

 

 

Containing the menace of wheat rusts

In the 2014/15 cropping season, Ethiopia produced 4.23 million tons of wheat grain on 1.7 million hectares of land, with an increase of more than 2 million tons since 2007/8. Wheat is an incredibly important crop in Ethiopia and significantly contributes to the livelihood of smallholder farmers and urban consumers.

Announcement: 2017 CIMMYT basic wheat improvement course

Photo: Katie Lutz/CIMMYT

By Mike Listman/CIMMYT

EL BATAN, Mexico (October 13, 2016)- A unique professional development opportunity for early-career wheat scientists in the public and private sectors, this course aims to impart the skills and knowledge needed to design and run a sustainable breeding program, familiarize participants with improved wheat germplasm and new wheat improvement technology, improve awareness of support disciplines (pathology, physiology, quality, statistics, biotechnology, GIS, and social sciences), and foster positive attitudinal changes (confidence, motivation, and appreciation of team work and interdisciplinary research).

To register or read more about the course, click here.